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William Byrd - Music Of The 16th And 17th Centuries Volume 7: Music For Voice And Viols album flac

  • Performer: William Byrd
  • Album: Music Of The 16th And 17th Centuries Volume 7: Music For Voice And Viols
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William Byrd - Music Of The 16th And 17th Centuries Volume 7: Music For Voice And Viols album flac

Tracklist

A1 Prélude And Fantasia (À 5)
A2 La Virginella
A3 My Sweet Little Darling
A4 Fantasia (À 3)
A5 What Pleasure Have Great Princes
A6 Though Amaryllis Dance In Green
B1 In Nomine (À 5)
B2 Blessed Is He That Fears The Lord
B3 O Lord, How Long Wilt Thou Forget
B4 Fantasia (À 6)
B5 The Man Is Blest That God Doth Fear
B6 Why Do I Use My Paper, Ink And Pen

Other versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
MHS 689 William Byrd Music Of The 16th And 17th Centuries Volume 7: Music For Voice And Viols ‎(LP) Musical Heritage Society MHS 689 US Unknown

Christmas Music of the 15th and 16th Centuries Capella Antiqua Munchen conducted by Konrad Ruhland Anon. 15th . -Jure plaudant omnia 1:24 Anon.

Five pieces by William Byrd-Fantasy Quartet; Fantasia for four viols; Two fantasias for three viols; Fantasia for four viols. X. Fantasia for four viols by Giovanni Coprario. XI. Two pieces by Orlando Gibbons-Duet for two viols; Trio for three viols. XII. Two pieces by Henry Purcell-Fantasia for three viols; Fantasia for four viols. Alman by Thomas Tomkins.

Label Category Country Year. MHS 689. William Byrd. Music Of The 16th And 17th Centuries Volume 7: Music For Voice And Viols (LP, Mono). Musical Heritage Society.

3 General Information. This file is part of the Sibley Mirroring Project.

During the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603), English art and high culture reached a pinnacle known as the height of the English renaissance. Elizabethan music experienced a shift in popularity from sacred to secular music and the rise of instrumental music. Professional musicians were employed by the Church of England, the nobility, and the rising middle-class. Elizabeth I was very fond of music and played the lute and virginal among others

Arranged By – Thurston DartWritten-By – William Corkine. A5. Fantasia For Viols In G Minor. Written-By – William Byrd. A6. Ah, Silly Poor Joas. Arranged By – Peter WarlockWritten-By – Anon. Arranged By – Fellowes Written-By – William Byrd. Ensemble – Wenzinger Consort Of Viols Of The Schola Cantorum Basiliensis.

William Byrd was born in London in 1540. Two of his brothers became choristers at St Paul’s Cathedral and, around 1550, he himself may have joined the boys of the Chapel Royal. His early musical training was overseen by adult members of the chapel, among them Thomas Tallis, who taught him keyboard playing. By March 1563 he was appointed organist of Lincoln Cathedral, a post secured on favourable financial terms and supported by the grant of a rectory. In 1568 Byrd married Juliana Birley at Lincoln. His output also included music for viol consort, for which there was a growing market, works for the Anglican liturgy, and many contrapuntal pieces and dances for keyboard. Byrd’s adherence to the Catholic faith brought him into potential conflict with the Elizabethan state. His house and servants were watched; he and his wife were cited for recusancy, or failure to attend church regularly.

The Complete Keyboard Music of William Byrd released: 1999. The Early Byrd (I Fagiolini & Fretwork feat. virginals: Sophie Yates, director: Robert Hollingworth released: 1999. BBC Music, Volume 6, Number 10: Masses and Motets (BBC Singers feat. conductor: Bo Holten) released: 1998. conductor: Andrew Carwood) released: 1998. With Lilies White: Consort Songs & Music for Viols (Ensemble Orlando Gibbons feat. alto: Gérard Lesne, viol: Wieland Kuijken) released: 1998. Renaissance Masterpieces, Volume I: Great Britain released: 1996

Everything changed in the 16th century when the Reformation reached England. These were traumatic times for the Church and its music, and two composers found themselves at the centre of the storm: Thomas Tallis and his pupil William Byrd (pictured). The complexity and sophistication of English choral writing in previous generations reached a highpoint in the Catholic music of Tallis. He experimented with complex structures, writing for multiple choirs and, in his famous motet Spem in Alium, music involving 40 separate parts

17th century England was troubled by the same kinds of problems as the rest of Europe-political, economic, and social problems made worse by religious division. The English parliament, which should have been an instrument for peaceful change, often only made things worse. But surprisingly enough, by the end of the 17th century the English found a lasting solution to the problems that confronted them. A. Economic-same as confronted rest of Europe, particular problem with insufficient royal revenue to meet new demands.

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