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Charles Trent - The Sound Of A Bluegrass Banjo album flac

  • Performer: Charles Trent
  • Album: The Sound Of A Bluegrass Banjo
  • FLAC: 1265 mb | MP3: 1456 mb
  • Released: 1962
  • Country: Canada
  • Style: Bluegrass, Country
  • Rating: 4.1/5
  • Votes: 781
  • Format: VOC MIDI ADX AAC WAV APE VQF
Charles Trent - The Sound Of A Bluegrass Banjo album flac

Tracklist Hide Credits

A1 Camptown Races
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
2:00
A2 Home Sweet Home
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
2:15
A3 Jessie James
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
2:12
A4 Blue Moon Of Kentucky
Written-By – Bill Monroe
2:04
A5 Maggie
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
2:22
A6 Ole Joe Clark
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
2:00
B1 Cripple Creek
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
1:55
B2 Grandfather's Clock
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
1:50
B3 Bonaparte's Retreat
Written-By – Pee Wee King
2:17
B4 Wildwood Flower
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
1:45
B5 John Henry
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
2:01
B6 Swanee River
Written-By – Trent*, Kennedy*, Singleton*
2:18

Companies, etc.

  • Distributed By – Smash Records
  • Distributed By – Mercury Record Corporation
  • Recorded At – Bradley Recording Studios
  • Pressed By – Columbia Records Pressing Plant, Terre Haute
  • Published By – MRC Music, Inc.
  • Published By – Peer International
  • Published By – Acuff-Rose

Credits

  • Banjo – Charles Trent
  • Bass – Buddy Killen
  • Drums – Murray Harman*
  • Guitar – Harold Bradley, Kelso Herston
  • Liner Notes, Directed By [Recording] – Shelby Singleton*
  • Piano – Pique Robbins*
  • Vocals [Choral Sequences] – Gordon Stoker, Margie Singleton, Millie Kirkham, Ray Walker

Notes

Also released in stereo: SRS 67002

Barcode and Other Identifiers

  • Matrix / Runout (Side A): MG 27002A S1 T
  • Matrix / Runout (Side B): MG 27002B S1 T
  • Rights Society: BMI

Other versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
MGS-27002(C), MGS 27002 Charles Trent The Sound Of A Bluegrass Banjo ‎(LP, Album, Mono) Mercury, Smash Records MGS-27002(C), MGS 27002 Canada 1962
MGS-27002, MGS 27002 Charles Trent The Sound Of A Bluegrass Banjo ‎(LP, Album, Mono) Smash Records , Smash Records MGS-27002, MGS 27002 US 1962
SRS 67002 Charles Trent The Sound Of A Bluegrass Banjo ‎(LP, Album) Smash Records SRS 67002 US 1962

The Sound of Bluegrass Banjo.

bluegrass banjo - country banjo.

This album, filled with some of the greatest banjo classics, is designed to help musicians develop basic bluegrass techniques, based on the styles of groups such as Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys, Flatt and Scruggs, the Foggy Mountain Boys, the Stanley Brothers and the Clinch Mountain Boys. The banjo solos on the CD, featuring such classics as 'The Ballad of Jed Clampett,' 'Salty Dog Blues' and 'Jesse James' are written out note-for-note in easy-to-follow tablature notation in the booklet enclosed with the album.

On that album, Monroe recorded a number of traditional fiddle tunes he had often heard performed by Vandiver. While the fast tempos and instrumental virtuosity characteristic of bluegrass music are apparent even on these early tracks, Monroe was still experimenting with the sound of his group. He seldom sang lead vocals on his Victor recordings, often preferring to contribute high tenor harmonies as he had in the Monroe Brothers. A 1945 session for Columbia Records featured an accordion, soon dropped from the band.

Charles Trenet is a English album released on Nov 2006. Charles Trenet Album has 12 songs sung by Charles Trenet. Listen to all songs in high quality & download Charles Trenet songs on Gaana. English Hindi Telugu Punjabi Tamil Kannada Bhojpuri Malayalam Marathi Bengali Haryanvi. Genres. Bollywood Songs Romantic Songs Devotional Songs Ghazals Bhajan Patriotic Songs Kids Songs Rock Songs Disco Songs Sufi Songs. Artists.

I remember back In the seventies and eighties, it was neigh on impossible to do a bluegrass show without performing Take Me Home, Country Roads, better known as just Country Roads. The audience would practically take us out to the nearest tree and hang us by our toes if we didn’t play it. And when we finally did play it, the audience would sing along, swaying back and forth and having a genuine feel-good Kumbaya moment. Country Roads was actually written by Bill Danoff, Taffy Nivert and John Denver, who was the first to record it in 1971. Instead of writing out a complicated banjo arrangement with all the rolls incorporated into the song, I only write out the bare-bones skeleton of the tune. That way, we can dress the skeleton with different rolls each time we play it. That means we’ll be improvising and our music still stay new and fresh instead of old and stale. Here’s my banjo tab of Country Roads.

Trenet's longevity was something of a surprise even to him - the singer had intended to retire in the 1970s, and had made a farewell tour of France; then he agreed to a request for a farewell concert in Canada and found the reception there so encouraging, that he chose to keep performing and was still working in the 1990s, a. period in which at least four CDs of his work were released, including a best-of collection produced by British reissue expert Tony Watts. Charles Trenet - Y& d& joie et autres succès (Full Album, Album complet). Charles Trenet - Que Reste-T-il De Nos Amours.

Historically, the banjo occupied a central place in African-American traditional music and the folk culture of rural whites before entering the mainstream via the minstrel shows of the 19th century. The banjo, along with the fiddle, is a mainstay of American old-time music. It is also very frequently used in traditional ("trad") jazz. Open strings and highest note of a standard-tuned five-string bluegrass banjo. Some banjos have a separate resonator plate on the back of the pot to project the sound forward and give the instrument more volume. This type of banjo is usually used in bluegrass music, though resonator banjos are played by players of all styles, and are also used in old-time, sometimes as a substitute for electric amplification when playing in large venues. Open-back banjos generally have a mellower tone and weigh less than resonator banjos.